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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've owned my G8 for 5 years & have put over 135K on her, I love my car, I've modded her, pimped her out, & loved every minute of it.

But, Over the years I've had electrical issues including:

A horrible electrical whine in the cabin that would get lounder the harder you drove. Voltage drop upon ignition (engineering mode) random battery issue...etc.

Random starting issues (Click Click no start, slow cranking, Immobilization mode, limp mode, etc)

Dimming lights at night including my Headlights, Dome light, & vanity mirrors.

Well, it all came to a end on Sunday as I've found the culprit. My issue was the Bolt which secured the Ground Cable to the chassis!!!

You see this bolt is exposed on the underside of the car right above the driver side exhaust hanger. My bolt had corroded on the undersize and somehow began arching off the chasis ground. The lip of the bolt was MELTED!!!!!!

I carefully removed the bolt, cleaned the bore threats, cleaned the ground clamp, and replaced the bolt with a $1.50 bolt from a local hardware store. I then rehooked up the negative to the battery turned the key and my car started faster than it EVER has!!! That night I went for a ride....my headlights were brighter than I ever have seen them, dome light was fine, no dimming & that annoying whine had 100% vanished!!! Engineering mode now report my 1 month old battery holding a charge at 95%, My battery voltage at upon ignition is 12.4v and barely moves upon turning the key.

I've seen hundreds of post in this forum over the years about many of these issues......no one has ever mentioned replacing this bolt. If you are having ANY of these issues I dare you clean the ground area and bore and replace the bolt.
 

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Could you explain a little more where this bolt is? Drivers side exhaust hanger where? Front? Back? Still having a small audio whine here, and that is one bolt I haven't found yet!
 

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I've owned my G8 for 5 years & have put over 135K on her, I love my car, I've modded her, pimped her out, & loved every minute of it.

But, Over the years I've had electrical issues including:

A horrible electrical whine in the cabin that would get lounder the harder you drove. Voltage drop upon ignition (engineering mode) random battery issue...etc.

Random starting issues (Click Click no start, Immobilization mode, limp mode, etc)

Dimming lights at night including my Headlight, Dome light, & vanity mirrors.

Well, it all came to a end on Sunday as I've found the culprit. My issue was the Bolt which secured the Ground Cable to the chassis!!!

You see this bolt is exposed on the underside of the car right above the driver side exhaust hanger. My bolt had corroded on the undersize and somehow began arching off the chasis ground. The lip of the bolt was MELTED!!!!!!

I carefully removed the bolt, cleaned the bore threats, cleaned the ground clamp, and replaced the bolt with a $1.50 bolt from a local hardware store. I then rehooked up the negative to the battery turned the key and my car started faster than it EVER has!!! That night I went for a ride....my headlights were brighter than I ever have seen them, dome light was fine, no dimming & that annoying whine had 100% vanished!!! Engineering mode now report my 1 month old battery holding a charge at 95%, My battery voltage at upon ignition is 12.4v and barely moves upon turning the key.

I've seen hundreds of post in this forum over the years about many of these issues......no one has ever mentioned replacing this bolt. If you are having ANY of these issues I dare you clean the ground area and bore and replace the bolt.
Nice find. I bet this ends up helping a multitude of folks
 

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Pics man, pics!
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Could you explain a little more where this bolt is? Drivers side exhaust hanger where? Front? Back? Still having a small audio whine here, and that is one bolt I haven't found yet!

The bolt is to the left of the battery, accessible from the trunk. It's the single bolt that secures the ground cable to the chassis.

The bottom of the bolt is exposed to the elements but you remove/replace the bolt from the trunk.
 

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Excellent find and thank you for sharing with everyone, I'm sure you're discovery will help many members that have had electrical gremlins.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Pics man, pics!
I attached the pic of the bolt, had to resize the heck out of it.

Rust + Current = PROBLEMS!!!

I bet half of the poster on this forum would be SHOCKED if they removed their bolt and replaced it with a new one.

How GM/Holden hasn't put a TSB out about this is beyond me. There are tons of posts about these electrical issues with VE's all across the globe. So many people say its the alternator or EM interference. Nope the 140 amp alternator in this car is pretty solid, it this stupid ground bolt which is exposed to the elements from the underside of the trunk.
 

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The bolt is to the left of the battery, accessible from the trunk. It's the single bolt that secures the ground cable to the chassis.

The bottom of the bolt is exposed to the elements but you remove/replace the bolt from the trunk.
Thanks for the info, I figured that was the one you were talking about but I didn't know because it sounded like it was from the bottom, didn't realize it was exposed to the bottom of the car, I am sure with the Canadian winters mine has been compromised, will check shortly!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the info, I figured that was the one you were talking about but I didn't know because it sounded like it was from the bottom, didn't realize it was exposed to the bottom of the car, I am sure with the Canadian winters mine has been compromised, will check shortly!
I can almost guarantee you following my direction will totally eliminate your noise.

Be very careful when removing it, I used one of my Dad's old lead breaker bars on the wrench as I didn't want to hurt the threads. I also WD40'd the heck out of the underside before removal. Finally baking soda & water on a .357 brass brush to clean the bore and then run a paper towel through it to get all the loose rust out of the bore. I also used to Dielectric grease on the tip of the bolt and then some more on the ground & bolt before I tightened it.

I live outside of Pittsburgh, PA & spend a lot of time in Cleveland working. The exposure of that bolt to winter weather surely will compromise its integrity.
 

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I can almost guarantee you following my direction will totally eliminate your noise.

Be very careful when removing it, I used one of my Dad's old lead breaker bars on the wrench as I didn't want to hurt the threads. I also WD40'd the heck out of the underside before removal. Finally baking soda & water on a .357 brass brush to clean the bore and then run a paper towel through it to get all the loose rust out of the bore. I also used to Dielectric grease on the tip of the bolt and then some more on the ground & bolt before I tightened it.

I live outside of Pittsburgh, PA & spend a lot of time in Cleveland working. The exposure of that bolt to winter weather surely will compromise its integrity.
Got it up, mine didn't seem as bad, cleaned it all up, sanded a bit of paint off, and added die electric grease, time will tell!
 

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Got it up, mine didn't seem as bad, cleaned it all up, sanded a bit of paint off, and added die electric grease, time will tell!
Just so you know, dielectric grease is an insulator NOT a conductor. It will not and does not help your ground or any electrical connections. It is used to put on rubber spark plug boots to keep the boot from sticking to the plug and to help insulate the current so it doesn't arc out. It's also used on weather packing around your connectors, but should not ever be applied to electrical contacts. Also, grinding paint off just to give yourself a good ground was counter productive. You exposed bare metal which will rust and wont really improve your ground connection. You would have been better off running a tap through the bolt hole and get the correct bolt for the thread you just tapped. Your ground connection actually comes from thread contact in the weldnut the bolt passes through.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Just so you know, dielectric grease is an insulator NOT a conductor. It will not and does not help your ground or any electrical connections. It is used to put on rubber spark plug boots to keep the boot from sticking to the plug and to help insulate the current so it doesn't arc out. It's also used on weather packing around your connectors, but should not ever be applied to electrical contacts. Also, grinding paint off just to give yourself a good ground was counter productive. You exposed bare metal which will rust and wont really improve your ground connection. You would have been better off running a tap through the bolt hole and get the correct bolt for the thread you just tapped. Your ground connection actually comes from thread contact in the weldnut the bolt passes through.

Remember Corrosion is the issue here, that is why the grease was applied in a sparing amount. But I also installed a brand new bolt with the proper thread pattern.

What I did fixed a myriad of issues that have affected my G8 for years.
 

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Remember Corrosion is the issue here, that is why the grease was applied in a sparing amount. But I also installed a brand new bolt with the proper thread pattern.

What I did fixed a myriad of issues that have affected my G8 for years.

I will say it again.... DIELECTRIC GREASE IS NOT A CONDUCTOR. Sparingly or not, you do not use it for electrical contacts. That is all I'm going to say, i will not argue with self proclaimed internet experts spewing mis-information across the internet. Your free to hack your car as much as you please.
 

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I will say it again.... DIELECTRIC GREASE IS NOT A CONDUCTOR. Sparingly or not, you do not use it for electrical contacts. That is all I'm going to say, i will not argue with self proclaimed internet experts spewing mis-information across the internet. Your free to hack your car as much as you please.
I agree, it is not conductive, but can seal out moisture, and that is the purpose I have used it for.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
I will say it again.... DIELECTRIC GREASE IS NOT A CONDUCTOR. Sparingly or not, you do not use it for electrical contacts. That is all I'm going to say, i will not argue with self proclaimed internet experts spewing mis-information across the internet. Your free to hack your car as much as you please.
Considering what I did to "MY" car fixed a laundry list of issues I've had for YEARS I'd say what I did is perfectly fine. So does pretty much every sensor in my car. Prior to my fix my battery would fall well below 9-10v during ignition it now barely dips below 12v. So that insulator must really be messing up my electrical system. Electrical whine = Gone, Ticking & slow cranking = Gone, Dimming Lights = no more.

Your tone is kinda out of line for this thread in which I provided a FIX for a issue MANY VE owners across the globe have experienced.

Once again the grease is on the BOTTOM of the bore NOT on the threads. and there is a little bit on the top of the bolt. NOT on the bottom of the lip & the actual Chassis. But you in your almighty wisdom please continue to tell me what I did to fix "MY" Cars issue was terribly wrong considering you have never seen my cars behavior before or after the fix.
 

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I will say it again.... DIELECTRIC GREASE IS NOT A CONDUCTOR. Sparingly or not, you do not use it for electrical contacts. That is all I'm going to say, i will not argue with self proclaimed internet experts spewing mis-information across the internet. Your free to hack your car as much as you please.
While you are correct, dielectric grease is not a conductor, it can be used to cover a connection keeping moisture out and slowing the oxidation process. I use it on battery terminals and other places likely to see moisture. It is a perfectly valid use. The key is not to place it between the parts that are supposed to be conducting electricity. It is placed on the outside to seal the conducting parts in.
 

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This is all good info. Thanks everyone.
 

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This is where I use Copper Based Anti seize. Conductor AND corrosion prevention. There is also a ground strap under the fuse box under hood that needs the same treatment.
 

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Just so you know, dielectric grease is an insulator NOT a conductor. It will not and does not help your ground or any electrical connections. It is used to put on rubber spark plug boots to keep the boot from sticking to the plug and to help insulate the current so it doesn't arc out. It's also used on weather packing around your connectors, but should not ever be applied to electrical contacts. Also, grinding paint off just to give yourself a good ground was counter productive. You exposed bare metal which will rust and wont really improve your ground connection. You would have been better off running a tap through the bolt hole and get the correct bolt for the thread you just tapped. Your ground connection actually comes from thread contact in the weldnut the bolt passes through.
^Very good advice. I also find that painting a dry connection after assembly seals out water quite well.
 
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