Pontiac G8 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found this thread in the DIY section:

http://www.g8board.com/forums/showthread.php?t=31251

I was not able to see any photos there by the OP, so had a couple questions:

1.) Is there a thread equivalent to this DIY write up that does have photos?

2.) Is this procedure (hopefully with photos) the same for the V6? My G8 is a base model V6 with the stock brake calipers, pads, 18" rims (P245/45R18 96V), etc. and I would like to change out my brake pads in the near future (in my driveway, not at a shop).

3.) Does this brake pad changeout on a V6 require you to get into the brake fluid system and thus need to bleed the brakes when finished? I don't want to do any fluid bleeding if at all possible.

It was not clear to me when I am looking at my G8 front brakes how you access the pads. I've attached two photos here. One is of my G8 front brakes and the 'cover' I am meaning to know how to remove is seen from the front with the three 'fingers' so to speak. I know it needs to come off, just not 100% how and like I said, I don't need to get into the brake fluid areas by accident. The second picture is a DeLorean front brake caliper on a bench and you can see what I mean about having clear access into the pads once you remove the pins. There is no separate cover over it in the way.

Thanks for your help.

Auto part Wheel Tire Automotive tire Disc brake


Auto part
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,145 Posts
The brake pad replacement is the same for all G8s and one of the easiest I have ever done. Pull the bottom caliper pin out, pivot the caliper up, pull old pads out, check brackets for bends or cracks, check guide pin boots for seal breaks or cracks, install new pads( make sure to line them up correctly and on the right side of the rotor), compress pistons with a c clamp or piston spreader, swing caliper back down, clean and re apply blue locktite to lower caliper bolt, tighten up nice and tight. Compress brake pedal so the new pads form. Although you don't need to bleed your fluid, if you haven't done it before, I highly recommend bleeding the system with fresh fluid. New fluid and new pads make a world of difference. PM me for any other questions. If you'd like some hands on help, I could even meet you halfway or something. Cheers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,154 Posts
karl was spot on. I'll add you should inspect your rotors while you're at it they may need replacement or turning. adds a little more time to the job, but the cars already on jacks with the wheels off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,145 Posts
karl was spot on. I'll add you should inspect your rotors while you're at it they may need replacement or turning. adds a little more time to the job, but the cars already on jacks with the wheels off.
This. You may not be able to see if there is a problem but a good visual inspection, cleaning any build up off the rotor hat, is always a good idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Pull the bottom caliper pin out...
Thanks Karl.

Just to be certain I am thinking what you are thinking, does anyone have a photo of their brake caliper with a graphical arrow or two on it showing where this pin is? And the boot mentioned also. I just want to make sure I'm headed in the right direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,145 Posts
I'm not that tech savvy for that, but here is a pic of the the pin and boot. There are two, both right behind the caliper at the top and bottom.
 

·
The Mustang dude
Joined
·
1,438 Posts
Swap pads without machining the rotors? No bleeding the system?

Jesus... you guys wonder why you have shake when you get on the brakes hard. LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,145 Posts
The OP didn't mention any shimmy so....if it ain't broke. We mentioned the bleeding.
 

·
IdontRe Member
Joined
·
631 Posts
Swap pads without machining the rotors? No bleeding the system?

Jesus... you guys wonder why you have shake when you get on the brakes hard. LOL
Why would you touch the rotors? All is needed is a pad swap and some fresh fluid after a proper bleed...all of which was suggested previously by several posts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
No shimmy, that's right. No intention to touch the rotors (unless there is discovery work).

Question on new brake fluid: are you recommending new brake fluid because it is expected to have broken down chemically over the 4 years the car has been on the road? Or is there some other reason I am not thinking of? I keep an eye on the level and it looks right. I would top it up if needed.

Also, if I get in to do pads and do not open up any of the fluid lines, why would they need to be bled? I thought the intention of replacing pads as an easy and straight forward job is because it is just wrenches and zip-zip and you're done (and not fooling around bleeding your brake system as well).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,145 Posts
Short answer. Flush the brakes. 4 years is way to long to be on the same brake fluid imo. How much fluid in the master cylinder has little to do with the quality of it. As pads wear, the fluid will drop a little (pistons have longer travel) but 4 year old stuff is full of contaminants so please, do a flush. Take it to a shop if you're not comfortable doing it yourself. Cost about $100, but either way, your car needs new fluid. Don't waste good new pads on old, tired fluid. Grab some Dot 4 and give her what she needs!

Remember, fluid temp rises and can boil, moisture and air bubbles form, performance drops. I change mine around every 1 and a half years under normal driving.

Yes, pads can be changed without bleeding the system, but spend the extra and do it.
 

·
The Mustang dude
Joined
·
1,438 Posts
I say rotors because machining the rotors during a brake job are far more important than changing out 4 yr old brake fluid, IMO.
My rotors come off get measured and touched up slightly at every brake job. No problems ever and at 10 bucks each, its good peace of mind and just good maintenance. But to each their own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,154 Posts
a flush is a good idea, but I'm not sure I'd take to the level of 4 years being way too long on the same fluid. a lot has to do with climate, miles, driving habits etc. also if you're not too savvy, you can do more harm then good by getting air in your lines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,145 Posts
a flush is a good idea, but I'm not sure I'd take to the level of 4 years being way too long on the same fluid. a lot has to do with climate, miles, driving habits etc. also if you're not too savvy, you can do more harm then good by getting air in your lines.
Different strokes I guess. Most manufacturers recommend every 1 to 2 years. Sure you can go longer, but it's such an easy part of maintenance I do it every year and a half or so. But since you're installing new pads anyway, I still recommend new fluid. Not tech savvy? Have a local shop do it. No dealer visit required.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I just did my front brakes. Despite 55,000 miles on the car there was still a lot of "meat" left on the old pad. I think I could have gotten a good 15,000 to 20,000 more miles out of them. Pretty good for stock brake pads. I replaced them with ceramic pads, did not touch the rotors as they looked in good shape inside and out. The wear tab was still a few millimeters away from the rotor. I changed them because I could hear a slight squeal when lightly braking in reverse. I broke a bolt...turned it the wrong way..pretty stupid huh? It was an easy fix though. I just took a vice grip and wrench and took the rest of the bolt out of the pin. I have never done brakes before, but NTB wanted over $600 and Firestone over $400. I'll be screwed if I'll pay that for a brake job!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
By the way the new ones work like new. No noise at all. I think I'll pay someone to flush and fill the brake fluid, after reading some of these posts it seems like a good idea. Probably should have had the rotors turned too, but they were still in good shape. It'll be an interesting to see how long the pads last.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Turning good rotors is old thinking... Sorry. Replace if near or below min. thickness or if out of round. Replace brake fluid every two years or check condtion with the strips.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
367 Posts
I had my rotors turned to give them a fresh surface and to get the glaze off them before installing my new pads.
 

·
Have Bar Will Travel
Joined
·
716 Posts
Couple of suggestions based on the idea that your car is driven alot.

1) go ahead and take the rotors off and have then turned - not necessary but good insurance for the new pads - you most likely don't need new rotors.
Getting the rotors off will be a touch of a cast iron B. they are rusted to your hubs - not the end of the world but you need a rubber mallet of some flavor, and some penetrating lube - I prefer Liquid wrench but whatever that isn't WD-40.

place 1 or 2 lug nuts back onto the wheel studs loosely - spray oil into the holes around the wheel lugs - then if you can spray on the back of the rotor - aimed at the wheel hubs. it won't hurt the hubs. wait a bit - spray through the lug holes again - with mallet strike the edge of the rotor aiming radially toward the hub - DO NOT STRIKE THE ROTOR FACES - WHERE THE PADS RIDE. after a few love taps your rotor will break off the wheel hub - this is good. remove lug nuts and remove rotor.

2) do to this you need to remove the caliper - might as well inspect it - you don't have to remove the brake line and you don't have to bleed the brakes. remove caliper pin bolts they are smaller 16mm (IIRC) that are silver in color and are on teh back side of the calipers - they are into 2 small tabs of the caliper. you will also need a same sized open end wrench to hold the base of the caliper pin. they will turn with the bolt if you don't. again size is 16mm IIRC, but I also have a gt not a base model.

before removing it completely - with a C-clamp or a caliper re-set tool (they can be rented) press the caliper pots back into the caliper - these are the round bits in the caliper body that move out with hydraulic fluid and press the pads in. you can push the fluid back through the system. now at this point I recommend cracking the bleeder screw - on the top of the caliper with a rubber nub covering it - this allows fluid and air to exit the system.. thus purging the fluid out - this is messy and tricky but it is good for your abs parts. here I like to put a hose on the nub and run it over to a bottle.

push the pistons slowly - you will also notice that air can build up in the boots around the piston - burb them with a small, smooth deice - I have an oring pick but you can use anything. smooth and not pointy - don't jab into the boot - instead slide under from the piston. Reasoning - if you don't the boot stays inflated while the pistons will go back in - this puts the boot against the pad and it might burn under hard braking - allowing dirt and crap into the pistons damaging them later.

Remove hose - retighten bleeder. IIRC bleeder screw was a 10mm.

resetting the pistons now will save you some hassle later.

3) remove bolts - caliper will free from its bracket - with a wire coat hanger - bend up a loop so you can suspend the caliper from your spring . this allows you to keep the caliper line connected and keep you from straining and damaging the line. all good things.

remove caliper bracket bolts - they are larger and threaded into the knuckle - so further down, and are IIRC 21 or 19 mm. similar or same to the lug nuts, again IIRC. they are sizeable on the gt, probably on the base model too. these will remove the bracket from the car - and allow you to remove the brake rotor - as the caliper bracket loops over the rotor - keeping it in place.

4) more good PM. with bracket in hand remove caliper pins - they are in the rubber boots at the top corners of the bracket - pull them out completely - clean off - re-grease. I like to use a tub of brake grease - it is a version of moly grease base and usually rather heat resistant. I don't buy packets of from the little stand by the register at autozone - not good stuffs. (just my opinion though).

5) removing that rotor was a biatch right - more PM. clean your hubs with whatever you wish to use. I like brake cleaner since I have it in my hand anyway. then scrubbed a touch - let dry - apply a thin coat of anti-sieze on the hub - again I like the stuff in a bottle with a cap brush - usually copper laden. works awesome. any antisieze will do.l

next time removing those rotor will go easier.

6) with rotors turned in your case - attached to car - run down one or 2 lug nuts (keeps the rotor in place). this is a optional thing but I like to do it. check your rotor and hub assembly runout. you will need a tool for this - called a runout tool or a brake rotor runout tool. they can be rented of you might know someone nearby to borrow one. if you lived in or around the memphis area I'd be happy to help.

since you are not replacing your rotors you can do this - mark which hole of the rotor was on the stud that was painted - you will notice that one of your wheel studs is coated black (or blue) and that marks a low runout position on the hub. the rotor needs to be "clocked" accordingly to prevent shaking. your OE rotors were clocked right from the factory so mark them before removing them

with new rotors you need a tool - and you need to take the time to clock them - takes all of 10 minutes.

7) then re attach your caliper bracket and run those large bolts down and tighten. I don't recall what the torque spec is but they are steel into steel and large so have at it if you wish. some people like to put blue loctite on these bolts so they don't back out. when I track prep my car - I do this. before using them please take a moment to inspect them - if threads are cracked off, you see oddities (you'll know it when you see it) buy a new bolt.

now that caliper brackets are back on.

8) remove your pad clips (stamped thin metal things sitting in and or falling out of your brackets). clean then and re-attach so they sit tight. they tend to be a royal pain. Again more PM - I like to but a very thin coat of that same brake grease on these clips - they are basically tracks that the tabs of your new pads will ride in. if they bind up you can have uneven braking or even bend a caliper. not necessary but good insurance - again though -very very thin coat. no globs.

9) set your new pads into the clips - some pads you buy will come with new clips in teh box - if they do - use them and forget the bit above. very few actually do and you normally don't need them. set pads so the are smooth - note when you move your hand they will move a bit - this is good means they aren't bound. they will however want to be snug on your rotor this is also good.

10) take caliper off your homemade hook - push caliper onto the new pads and rotor on the caliper bracket. resetting the pistions earlier helps here - it is easier to reset the pistons when the caliper is still bolted by one bolt to the car - makes it one less thing to hold. with pistons reset - should drop right into the bracket - re - attach pin bolts - they smaller bolts you took out earlier. they have a torque spec too and I don't recall it but you need to get near it in this case - so look it up. use the GT torque spec if you can't find a specific one it should be close enough. these bolts also has some locking compound on them - mine was yellow. I put blue loctite on them when I replace them.

Only time I recommend it with every re-application.

11) with rotor on, new pads in, caliper back on - check for leaks. apply the brake pedal - it will fail down the first press or 2. if you only did the one brake. more if you did both brakes. pedal will firm up after that - if it doesn't you might have a leak. check around the calipers and looks for fluid. shouldn't be any though. don't forget however to re-tighen your bleeders if you cracked them open. it will shoot fluid other wise.



If you choose to, and by age and time I highly recommend it - now is a great time to flush your brake system. but that's another bit of detail.


the steps I laid out sound daunting and time consuming - however I have run thorough this with total car newbs in under 4 hours. start to finish with me showing them the first one - and them doing the second one on their own. it's really not that much. and if you do it yourself you A) saved money, B) know you did it right and C) know you can do it again later.

many many shops take shortcuts to things and that bothers me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Very good description on how to do a brake job on a G8. Torque specs on the pin bolt are 31 foot pounds, at least on the base. It is recommended that you replace the bolts, new pin and bolt kits are available at O'Riely for 5 bucks, but the new pins suck, so I just used the old ones. After reading your description, and as I intend to keep the car for another 5 to 10 years, I should go back into it and do a better job, but being me I probably won't. I will print out your instructions though. The ones I had, supposedly from a GM service manual weren't nearly as good. By the way I checked out the Chevy SS today...I WANT!!!
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top