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So I'm getting the Big Red X on my gauge cluster, and my odometer has frozen. Reading around here, it looks like my gauge cluster has gone bad. The dealership wants $1,100 for a replacement...which is just insane. Used ones may end up doing the same thing. Has anyone tried repairing these? I'm considering trying the LG TV fix, which is as follows:

https://medium.com/@ijeyanthan/howto-bake-your-motherboard-to-fix-the-lg-tv-hdmi-ports-not-working-issue-a878016646de

Brief description: A common problem with LG TV's is the HDMI ports failing, and the fix is to pull the mother board out of the TV, throw it in the oven, and re-install it. It sounds crazy, but it worked on my TV. I didn't mind trying it because it's a $200 TV that was already broken, and I had nothing to lose. But it worked. You are cooking it at a specific temperature to melt the solder just enough, and then letting it set back up, hopefully repairing any failed soldering joints. I'm considering it for the gauge cluster board, but obviously there is more risk.

Anyone else get crazy with these things and try to repair them?
 

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So I'm getting the Big Red X on my gauge cluster, and my odometer has frozen. Reading around here, it looks like my gauge cluster has gone bad. The dealership wants $1,100 for a replacement...which is just insane. Used ones may end up doing the same thing. Has anyone tried repairing these? I'm considering trying the LG TV fix, which is as follows:

https://medium.com/@ijeyanthan/howto-bake-your-motherboard-to-fix-the-lg-tv-hdmi-ports-not-working-issue-a878016646de

Brief description: A common problem with LG TV's is the HDMI ports failing, and the fix is to pull the mother board out of the TV, throw it in the oven, and re-install it. It sounds crazy, but it worked on my TV. I didn't mind trying it because it's a $200 TV that was already broken, and I had nothing to lose. But it worked. You are cooking it at a specific temperature to melt the solder just enough, and then letting it set back up, hopefully repairing any failed soldering joints. I'm considering it for the gauge cluster board, but obviously there is more risk.

Anyone else get crazy with these things and try to repair them?
It may not even be solder joint related.

Components/parts do fail.
 
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