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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ever notice how plain and outdated the g8 dash is. How about that steering wheel, scale of 1-10 how much do you dislike it? I wanted to do something about it the day I got the car and I did. Every modification seemed to tie into one another. I started with the steering wheel, progressed to the brakes as it is tied in, also ended up doing the Holden IQ radio found in the series 2 VE commodores and EDI. As for the brakes, I have Jason from Envyous Customs to thank as he really came through in helping me with the series 2 ABS module, getting it retrofitted to the vehicle and programming it for me to better utilize the 6 piston brembos up front and the 4 piston brembos in the rear. The upgraded series 2 ABS module found on the chevy caprice ppv enhanced the braking as driving around on the stock ABS unit did not unlock the full potential of the brembo brakes.With a module that has the correct parameters, it is a completely different car and stops on a dime.
Getting right to it, a lot of time and research went into getting the vf (chevy SS) stuff to work on the g8. One final word before delving into this: the steering wheel controls. I am still developing an interface for the vf wheel to work with the stock headunit or the IQ unit. If you do the G8 designs kit with an aftermarket radio, this is as simple as utilizing an off the shelf steering wheel control converter box like the Metra Axxess. If you choose to do what I did, you do so at your own risk. Had to put it out there. You will need to do in- car soldering so be prepared. Do not use regular connectors or the pushlock connectors.

I have been driving around now with a Chevy SS wheel for 5 months now and I have had the car for 7 months.

When I got my G8, the first thing I wanted to do is get rid of the factory steering wheel. I really wasn't happy with it. It did not feel right for the car. I shopped around and settled on a chevy SS wheel for several reasons.
1). It is the same platform, just a newer generation
2). comes with paddle shifters so no custom work is necessary
3). it looks like it belongs in the car
4). readily available and cheap enough


If you compare a vf (chevy ss) wheel and a ve wheel (g8) plenty of things will jump out as being outwardly different. The steering wheel controls for one. Ve wheels have radio controls and DIC controls on the wheel and vf wheels have radio controls and cruise control on the wheel. Next, they both bolt up in the same method, but the spline count and orientation is different between both. Airbags wont transfer. Clockspring is different and the cutouts for the harness is different.

Discouraged yet?
Well I wasn't. I got my vf wheel with a column attached to it. So I ripped out the column from the g8. Side by side and more differences came to light. vf column has wider plastic surroundings, different mountings, and no provisions for an ignition lock. Luckily I have a chevy cruze in the family I was able to look at. The cruze column is a weird combo of a vf column and a ve column but had the same mounting as the vf column. I got warmer but wasnt quite there yet. I wanted a column with similar mountings as a g8, so what other car was developed in australia? Well the zeta camaro came to mind. Low and behold it used the same mounting arrangement as the g8, had an ignition switch, used the same clockspring as the vf and similar controls. So yes I purchased three steering columns before I found one that worked. Basically I did alot of legwork before I found a setup that would work

To perform this task, you will need some basic tools and some not so basic tools, as well as another car to rely on in case you don't finish in one day and trust me, you don't want to rush.

parts list
1x chevy ss steering wheel, and turn signal stalk
1x chevy camaro (I used 2010 -zeta body) steering column
1x gm airbag to be determined later
soldering iron pencil tip, solder, shrink tubing, zip ties
various bits and sockets, phillips, torx screwdriver bits and 7mm, 8mm-19mm sockets
dremel with discs and a cutoff wheel or a similar tool
some vinyl or leather scraps in black
prybar

PATIENCE

A few things to note, you will need to modify your hush panel to accept the bulkier plastics on the camaro column. They are basically wider than the ve column. You will be removing the ignition lock cylinder from your car as I did. A good way to understand what is involved is to watch a video like I did. This link is a ford ignition switch, but its basically the same principle just dressed up a little different.
You will obviously need to dissassemble the g8 column to get to it and the camaro column to do the same.This shows the steering wheel removal and basically how I started.
Another thing to note is that while you are playing in the column, now would be a good time to disable the key lock out feature which prevents key removal from the ignition without power. This video not only shows the parts of the camaro column, but will familiarize you with how the ignition lockout works. Should you decide to disable this, it is quite simple since you will be swapping lock cylinders.
To sum up, the only modifications you will be performing to the camaro column are transfering your ingition cylinder into the camaro lock cylinder housing.

You will need to consider the immobilizer, or the sensor that pics up the chip in the key. On the g8 it is the lighted ring around the key hole. On the cruze and camaro, it is not lighted and it is hidden behind the plastics. The immobilizer will need a little wiring modification, and so will the turn signal and wiper stalks. The steering angle sensor is a completely different animal. Once you disturb it you will need access to a scanner that can clear the code set by it. Make sure one is readily available. In my situation, I bought a tech 2 clone with the australian memory card and it is good thru 2012 so it will handle the g8 just fine.

I will try to break this up a little. The important stuff will come first over the course of several posts.

First will be familiarization with the lock cylinder and the column itself along with some videos.
Later I will follow with electrical work, and custom work for integration purposes.

Might edit along the way as I am digging through to make sure I didnot miss anything. This will not be a step by step, but more of what needs to be done.

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Note to the picture above, the bolt securing the clamp does not look as it does in this picture. It will most likely be a bolt like was used in the ford escape video above. the camaro column might have an allen head bolt or the same type of bolt.

TO BE CONTINUED
 

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This is awesome. Thanks for paving the way on a new DIY on our 10+ year old cars. In for updates.

Edited- On another note, if you're this deep into the airbag modules and wiring, I'm wondering if along the way, you might be able to find a way to fool the airbag system for us that want to use aftermarket seats or steering wheels.
 

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Ever notice how plain and outdated the g8 dash is. How about that steering wheel, scale of 1-10 how much do you dislike it? I wanted to do something about it the day I got the car and I did. Every modification seemed to tie into one another. I started with the steering wheel, progressed to the brakes as it is tied in, also ended up doing the Holden IQ radio found in the series 2 VE commodores and EDI.
How is the EDI working for you? I take it you don't have MRC to fully use it.

As for the brakes, I have Jason from Envyous Customs to thank as he really came through in helping me with the series 2 ABS module, getting it retrofitted to the vehicle and programming it for me to better utilize the 6 piston brembos up front and the 4 piston brembos in the rear. The upgraded series 2 ABS module found on the chevy caprice ppv enhanced the braking as driving around on the stock ABS unit did not unlock the full potential of the brembo brakes.With a module that has the correct parameters, it is a completely different car and stops on a dime.
I don't think the ABS module has any effect on the braking capabilities. I believe the ABS module only comes into play when ABS engages.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
How is the EDI working for you? I take it you don't have MRC to fully use it.



I don't think the ABS module has any effect on the braking capabilities. I believe the ABS module only comes into play when ABS engages.
I love EDI and since I went the IQ route the got a deal on the edi module, it was a no-brainer. I don't have Magnetic ride control, but if I get bored one day I will look into vf design and see what can be done to retrofit that.

The EBCM or ABS module does have an effect under normal driving. With an EBCM there is no mechanical proportioning valve and just an electronic counterpart that adjusts brake bias. This is where the tuning comes into play and if you simply upgrade the brakes you will never get the same effect if you do not program the ebcm. I am speaking from experience because I drove around with an untuned series 1 abs module and upgraded brakes for several months.

With the series 1 unit and upgraded brakes, the car's braking was not what I expected. There was minimal improvement with brembo brakes. The series 2 unit was properly calibrated for the brakes and therefore it actually justifies the conversion to bigger brakes. The series 1 unit can also be recalibrated, but with the column swap the original steering angle sensor will not work. You must switch to the series 2. That was why I went specifically with the series 2 and did not simply buy a series 1 unit and have it recalibrated in Australia for bigger brakes. (Makes no sense to ship the original unit when they are so cheap down there already and without it connected, the car is undriveable)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This is awesome. Thanks for paving the way on a new DIY on our 10+ year old cars. In for updates.

Edited- On another note, if you're this deep into the airbag modules and wiring, I'm wondering if along the way, you might be able to find a way to fool the airbag system for us that want to use aftermarket seats or steering wheels.
Fooling the system might be as easy as an inline resistor, if I come across anything, I will definitely let you know.
 

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I applaud your ingenuity, but in no way is the juice worth the squeeze. Plenty of companies out there that can do cool things with a factory wheel.
 

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Fooling the system might be as easy as an inline resistor, if I come across anything, I will definitely let you know.
Maybe, but does the resistor simply turn off the light or would it also allow for the rest of the system to stay operational when one or more components are missing?
 

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Maybe, but does the resistor simply turn off the light or would it also allow for the rest of the system to stay operational when one or more components are missing?
My guess is you only truly find out the answer to this question the hard way. Why risk it? Just have a factory G8 wheel modded and don't worry about the possibility of your SRS not working.
 

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My guess is you only truly find out the answer to this question the hard way. Why risk it? Just have a factory G8 wheel modded and don't worry about the possibility of your SRS not working.
Good guess but that's is not the ONLY way to find out. I'm not looking to do a VE steering wheel swap. The only real issue I'm concerned about is my other occupants. Putting myself in danger by not have an operational airbag is one thing. Getting t-boned in a heavily modified "Sunday" car, taking the kids out to get ice cream is another.
 
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