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Mac10 and Cheese
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Discussion Starter #1
I am running a 1900 TVS Maggie if that matters. Ever since replacing the MAF sensor the car started backfiring only under heavy throttle/RPM, but it did get rid of my P0174 code.
Thoughts? Thanks for your time!
 

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Is the mass airflow sensor stock or aftermarket replacement? Did you disconnect the battery for at least fifteen minutes after replacing?
 

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Checked the air filter? Scanned for potential pending check engine codes? Still have the old mass airflow sensor? If so, reinstall and see if the backfiring issue goes away. At the very least, it's certainly ironic. Can't necessarily blame the mass airflow sensor although I typically steer clear of O'Reilly's, Auto Zone, Napa, and etc. house brand critical electrical parts. At the very least, it's certainly ironic.
 

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That code is for it running lean on bank 2. Replacing the MAF is the last thing you needed. You either have a leak at a gasket or hose in the intake system (source of too much air). Or you have a dirty injectors, worse on bank 2 or the fuel pump is getting weak or a pinched line.(source of not enough fuel) Been years since I’ve seen a fuel pump fail, but at this age anything is possible. Rent a fuel pressure gauge to rule out the pump for low fuel pressure. If no leaking or cracked hoses found. Remove the spark plugs to see what cylinders are running lean. The colour will be easily seen. The pcm was trying to compensate, so some should be a little rich and the affected ones will be light coloured and clean. If it’s all one one side then it’s likely dirty injectors. Clean the original Maf and put it back in.
 

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I am running a 1900 TVS Maggie if that matters. Ever since replacing the MAF sensor the car started backfiring only under heavy throttle/RPM, but it did get rid of my P0174 code.
Thoughts? Thanks for your time!
What was the car doing before the new maf sensor and why did you replace it in the 1st place?
 

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Mac10 and Cheese
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36 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
What was the car doing before the new maf sensor and why did you replace it in the 1st place?
Car was hesitating during heavy throttle or when I perform a California stop at a free right turn.
Damaged MAF sensor when removing it so I had to replace it. Since the original is damaged, do you have a good recommendation for a replacement?
 

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Mac10 and Cheese
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36 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Checked the air filter? Scanned for potential pending check engine codes? Still have the old mass airflow sensor? If so, reinstall and see if the backfiring issue goes away. At the very least, it's certainly ironic. Can't necessarily blame the mass airflow sensor although I typically steer clear of O'Reilly's, Auto Zone, Napa, and etc. house brand critical electrical parts. At the very least, it's certainly ironic.
Air filter looks good, new K&N filter. No engine codes atm. Old MAF sensor is damaged.
 

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Ideally, an AcDelco General Motors original equipment would be the replacement. General Motors part number is 19351885. AcDelco part number is 19420212 for original equipment and 213-4781 for professional. GM Original Equipment parts are the true OE parts installed during production or validated by GM—designed, engineered, and tested to rigorous standards and backed by General Motors. ACDelco Gold (professional) parts are the high-quality alternative to OE parts, manufactured to meet GM expectations for fit, form, and function and backed by General Motors. By the way, Rock Auto has both in stock.
 

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Mac10 and Cheese
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36 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
That code is for it running lean on bank 2. Replacing the MAF is the last thing you needed. You either have a leak at a gasket or hose in the intake system (source of too much air). Or you have a dirty injectors, worse on bank 2 or the fuel pump is getting weak or a pinched line.(source of not enough fuel) Been years since I’ve seen a fuel pump fail, but at this age anything is possible. Rent a fuel pressure gauge to rule out the pump for low fuel pressure. If no leaking or cracked hoses found. Remove the spark plugs to see what cylinders are running lean. The colour will be easily seen. The pcm was trying to compensate, so some should be a little rich and the affected ones will be light coloured and clean. If it’s all one one side then it’s likely dirty injectors. Clean the original Maf and put it back in.
Whats an easy way to check for a leak at a gasket or hose?
 

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I use carburetor/ throttle body cleaner and spray it around the gasket, intake, etc. If the rpms surge, then you've located the leak. A more accurate test is a smoke machine. Aso, listen for faint hissing sounds in the engine bay.
 
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