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Somehow I knew that:)

I've had the dash apart when I did the 5 gauge pod and part of the console and rear seat out when I did the heated rear seats and dual fuel pumps.
Still might tackle trying to get the roof and rear seating area quieter though.
Your project definitely has my attention.
Do you have a thread and/or pics as it relates to the rear heated seats you did? Did you use OEM or aftermarket parts?
 

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Discussion Starter #62
Oh for the love of god, don't give me any more ideas! LOL :D

That caught my eye as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #63
So, this is the amp I was thinking of getting. It's got 5 channels at 100Wx 4 (Speakers are 100W RMS) and the sub channel is capable of a 1-Ohm load. The amp is rated at 600W @ 1-Ohm and since I got DVC Subs, I can wire them in such configuration. :D

600W is 120% RMS rating, so it checks the 75-150% box. :) I can adjust the levels if it's too much.

It's got speaker level inputs. I just have to cut the harnesses that come with it and splice.

 

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Check out Stevens thread on the board.
Its about 2 years old he gutted his G8 also and re-wired it, don't remember how much sound proofing he did but he used a Fosgate amp, maybe the same one and re-placed all the speakers, sorry don't remember the brand, also went to mirroring for the screen.
I've seen and heard his work....the sound proofing is good but the music blocks out everything and then some, boy it was loud!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #65
Check out Stevens thread on the board.
Its about 2 years old he gutted his G8 also and re-wired it, don't remember how much sound proofing he did but he used a Fosgate amp, maybe the same one and re-placed all the speakers, sorry don't remember the brand, also went to mirroring for the screen.
I've seen and heard his work....the sound proofing is good but the music blocks out everything and then some, boy it was loud!!!!
I'll look for that..

I'm still thinking of pairing this with a LOC like an AudioControl LCQ-1... but I'm just not sure. Anyways, I need to go to bed before I actually spend money...... :D
 

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Do you have a thread and/or pics as it relates to the rear heated seats you did? Did you use OEM or aftermarket parts?
It's buried in the Stereo/Electronics section. If I remember correctly, I did it in 2012. Search "heated rear seats" and it should pop right up.
 

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Discussion Starter #68 (Edited)
Removing the floor is actually not all that hard. You have some perforated parts of the carpet to cut. The yellow one is easy to cut with a razor. The red line marks the start of the other, and I used a recip saw blade to cut. The actuator ducting is sort of in the way. There is a third hidden in the back that I couldn't get to, so I cut another spot that is easily reparable.



Then came carpet removal.

Lifting the carpet from the back and folding it over being sure not to catch any wiring harnesses, I pulled it up to the front crossmember (seat rail). The front footwell is where the carpet is attached. I used the wide plastic upholstery tool the scrape since it functioned well as a scraper. I scraped forward until it was entirely separated. You can tell pretty easily when you're done. I actually took this time to get the floor ducts out of the way. I think that was probably unnecessary, because it was hard to reach under there.

There are two plastic push rivets on either side holding these ducts in. Once pulled out the ducts come out fairly easily.

Anyways, once the floor is cut in the right spots, and the glue is separated, you have one plastic holder on either side. There is one in each foot-well on the outside. I'll take a picture later. They are round plastic pieces. They are shaped like washers and you screw them on like a nut... eh.....

Once those are removed, you can remove the carpet. It's a careful process. You have to fold it forward from the back, and then you have access to move it around. You will not find it difficult. This is one of those things where you just use good sense. There is no step by step instruction, just "Remove the carpet." :)

I will say the most delicate part is making sure it clears the shifter handle and cover. Once you do that, you can pull it carefully back to clear the pedals and front well. Just be careful it clears all wiring harnesses. You might have to unplug one or two.

I pulled it clear and removed it from the car. :D



And I said I wasn't gonna remove the carpet.
 

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every village has one
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If you're anything like me, if you hadn't taken the carpet out you'd have thought about it afterward.
You're only going to be in it that deep once, might as well make it count!
 

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Discussion Starter #70
That was precisely my train of thought. I was thinking on my way home that I was going to go out and take a look to see if I could find the perforations that were there for cutting.

Once I found them, I felt confident that I could get it out and later back in. :)

A lot of folks at work and elsewhere just think I'm crazy.... LOL
 

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Good thread! I actually had my headliner reupholstered a couple of weeks ago. While the shop had the headliner out, I installed some of SDS's CLD tiles and HMF... I plan to do full car eventually. At the moment, I have doors, trunk, trunk lid, and now roof, treated with KnuKoncepts KnoKnoise Kolossus (a dynamat-style product with an uncomfortable amount of Ks, but one that was top-rated by a guy who tested 20+ products at DIYMA). I also squirted silicone into any small crevasses between stamped metal pieces that may vibrate together and rattle.

My roof treatment looked like this...




Something to keep in mind with the sound dampening (dynamat, hushmat, whatever brand) is that, if it's good-quality stuff, you really only need 25% coverage of a panel for the most noticeable difference. Anything more and you'll run into diminishing returns where the additional product is not going to add noticeable, proportionate additional performance. This is in response to a couple of posters mentioning using the dynamat-style product in their trunk to reduce noise volume... Not directed at you OP. And as OP has already stated, these products will not/are not designed to reduce road noise, despite what the manufacturer might write on their box. It's to reduce panel vibration/resonance. I know my local custom audio shops don't know what MLV treatment is, so when you go to them for "sound treatment," they charge you two grand and just add a couple hundred pounds of sound dampener. It's a joke.

Here is small sample of the difference the CLD tiles made on roof... Definitely adds to the overall tactile feel of the car. No more faint resonance/echo in the roof when closing the doors.


https://youtu.be/S7Ku9kfzfRM
 

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Discussion Starter #72 (Edited)
I remember when I started the planning phase. I saw full coverage and thought that was the way it was done. I kept digging and found other resources that lead me to change to 30-40% coverage for the Rock-Mat I chose. It's fairly similar in quality to the others, but its a tad thinner (8mils thinner). So I upped the final coverage from a quarter.

If I did full coverage, I'd probably use something like 150sq ft. At 36lbs per roll, that's 108lbs total weight just in matting. Totally unacceptable. :D
 

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Awesome post. Overall how difficult would you rate the removal of the entire interior? I've been planning this project for quite some time on my G8 and also my wifes TBSS. Keep up the good work!
 

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Discussion Starter #74
Awesome post. Overall how difficult would you rate the removal of the entire interior? I've been planning this project for quite some time on my G8 and also my wifes TBSS. Keep up the good work!
I'd say it is more tedious than difficult. The biggest thing is a lack of experience. Your likelihood of breaking a part or two is pretty high.

I'm going to cover the parts that I consider most easy to break later on when I'm done in hopes of saving people some of the grief.

Repairs to the dash panels were possible, but it would not have been 100%. Since I found replacements all is good. :) Two are new, and two are second hand (intact). Some other parts I found to be broken when disassembling. I am replacing those as well. :)

So in summary, it's not hard for the technically inclined, but it is tedious.
 

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Discussion Starter #75 (Edited)
Didn't have a lot of time today. While the wife and her sister were out shopping, I took some time to clean up the front foot well of the fuzzy leftovers from the carpet insulation and then I applied some dampening mats.

I used a solvent based adhesive remover and a plastic scraper for the putty material. I didn't go any farther than that on those pads. I cut them to reasonable sizes and applied accordingly. I feel like the coverage is sufficient. The biggest impact area was the vertical seat front.

I put the scrap piece on there.... now it bothers me when I look at he picture.. LOL :D

The tunnel might get a few more patches in the back and middle on the sides. Up front I'll be adding a piece on top. I don't think I need any coverage on the seat rails aside from what I already did. It seems like it would be overkill since the seat itself will be attached to them.

In fact, the floor shouldn't need a ton of coverage outside of the tunnel area. The seat and carpet will subdue a lot of vibration on the actual floor. There are some areas that appears to benefit, but the MLV looks like it will be the high impact material down there as far as effectiveness goes.


 

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Discussion Starter #76
From the rear window, a full view.

 

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Discussion Starter #77
So, I found a sealant for sound that I was thinking of using on any gaps in the MLV in places where doubling up might be a problem (i.e. using MLV with contact adhesive like tape). I could bead this in and butter it around, then cover with the regular wide black tape used for MLV applications.

What do you guys think? It's a sound blocking calking compound.

 

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Discussion Starter #78
Saturday went okay. Got the driver's side of the car all set with dampening mat. Then I got the roof. Both are more than sufficient. You can knock on the roof now and it's nice and solid. Well, as solid as sheet metal can be. No resonance. :)


 

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Discussion Starter #79 (Edited)
Necessary tools/items:

  1. Vinyl tape: Thin and easily pliable
  2. Needle Nose: Handy for the wire holder clips (press and release kind)
  3. Folding Utility Knife: Much better than the retracting kind.
  4. Contact Cement: Good stuff.
  5. Straight Edge: Unless you like misshapen edges....
  6. Roller: For deadening and for the CCF and MLV
  7. Gold or Silver Paint Sharpie: Takes the guess work out of cutting to fit
  8. Tape Measure: Accuracy, folks. Accuracy!
These items are sort of the critical items for the job other than the MLV and CCF materials.
 

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Discussion Starter #80 (Edited)
This job is quite tedious as far as measuring and cutting....and remeasuring... and cutting again. With every place, I first measured the overall outline needed. The first one was a bit of a screw up. I went to the trouble of attaching Velcro strips. Also, by the time this photo was taken the cement dried..... I think the cold had something to do with that, but after reapplying all was good.

You don't have to coat the CCF really. The idea is to get it to adhere and stay put, and it does.



I ended up cutting the piece down substantially. You must do all of you measurements and adjustments without the CCF attached. Simply cut the piece to the initial measurement, and then reshape as necessary. It will never fit perfectly the first time. You can make cuts to bend it and then seal them up later. In some bays that works well. In others it makes work more difficult. So it is worth a re-cut or four to get it right.

On this piece, I just cut it to match the footwell. It then fit in nicely. I still have yet to find an effective place for the piece with the Velcro on it.



The material fit into the spot just fine, but there are a few things I learned here to modify my approach for the other side. I'll go ahead and cover the door side of the well later mostly just for good measure.

  • You have to cut out the part near the seat electrical plug bracket.
  • Take your time recutting; It is better to custom fit than smash to match



During the whole process, you must be cognizant of the thickness of your new material relative to the bare steel. That's why I spent so much time cutting to fit the contours as tightly as possible. The carpet is formed to those contours. You are probably going to need to make modifications, but you don't want the carpet to be wavy.
 

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