Pontiac G8 Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys

Im at solo performances home shop im just wondering

What exhaust gaskets to use the stockers or kooks header gasket..
And if i do use the stock gasket.. Its just that a stock gasket correct

Like i dont need a special part number or anything

I heard the kooks gaskets were not so good

Anyone care to help?
Thanks
Jordan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
I just ordered a new set of stock gaskets for use with my kooks LTs. Worked good.


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Ive reused them twice now so i prolly wont use em again

Got some new ones

Thanks guys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
528 Posts
The new gaskets that come with Kooks headers worked great for me. Something I definitely recommend re-using are the factory manifold bolts for your headers. They're better than the hardware Kooks sends you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
I used the Kooks bolts. Not sure why, I agree the stock ones are better. I also sprayed the gaskets with copper gasket spray. Probably not needed, but somebody told me to when I was 12, and I've used it ever since.


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

·
****cray
Joined
·
2,199 Posts
use only the stock gaskets. a little brake cleaner
with some scotch brite pads and they're brand new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,307 Posts
FWIW, Scotch Brite does not come near my engine - just not worth it. Even on the exhaust side on the head.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

General Motors Technical Service Bulletin for what it's worth


INFORMATION

Bulletin No.: 00-06-01-012D

Date: October 25, 2011

Subject: Use of "Surface Conditioning Disks" When Cleaning Engine Gasket Sealing Surfaces and/or Reused Engine Parts

Models:
2013 and Prior GM Passenger Cars and Trucks
Supercede:
This bulletin is being revised to add the 2010-2013 model years and add Alternative Cleaning Method. Please discard Corporate Bulletin Number 00-06-01-012C (Section 06 - Engine/Propulsion System).
The Use of "Surface Conditioning Disks"



Notice
Do not use abrasive pad/bristle devices to clean the gasket surfaces of engine components. Abrasive pads should not be used for the following reasons:
  • Abrasive pads will produce fine grit that the oil filter will not be able to remove from the oil. THIS GRIT IS ABRASIVE AND HAS BEEN KNOWN TO CAUSE INTERNAL ENGINE DAMAGE. Abrasive pads can easily remove enough material to round cylinder head surfaces. This has been known to affect the gasket's ability to seal, especially in the narrow seal areas between the combustion chambers and coolant jackets.
  • Abrasive pads, wire and abrasive rubber finger wheels can also remove enough metal to affect cylinder head, block, oil pan rail, and intake manifold runner flatness, which can cause coolant and oil leaks and air leaks. It takes about 15 seconds to remove 0.203 mm (0.008 in) of metal with an abrasive pad.
  • Abrasive pads, Abrasive rubber fingers wheels & wire wheels with high speeds grinders produce air bourn debris that can travel throughout the shop contaminating other work being performed outside of the immediate work area.
When cleaning engine gasket sealing surfaces and/or cleaning parts from an engine that are to be reused, surface conditioning disks (typically constructed of woven fiber or molded bristles) that contain abrasives, such as a high amount of Aluminum Oxide, should NOT be used.

The use of such surface conditioning disks dislodges Aluminum Oxide (from the disk) and metal particles, which can lead to premature engine bearing failure.

The presence of Aluminum Oxide in engine oil has been shown to cause premature engine bearing failure. In some cases, this failure occurs in as little as 2,200 km (1,000 mi) or less after the repair has been made.

Surface conditioning disks may grind the component material and imbed it into the disk. This can result when more aggressive grinding of the gasket surface takes place.

Recommended Cleaning Procedure

General Motors recommends the use of a razor blade or plastic gasket scraper to clean the gasket surface on engine components that are to be reused. When cleaning gasket surfaces, please note the following:

  • When using a razor blade type gasket scraper, use a new razor blade for each cylinder head and corresponding block surface. Hold the blade as parallel to the gasket surface as possible. This will ensure that the razor blade does not gouge or scratch the gasket surfaces.
  • Do not gouge or scrape the combustion chamber surfaces.
  • Do not gouge or scratch any engine-sealing surface during the cleaning process.
Alternative Cleaning Method:

To properly clean the sealing surface prior to reassembly, GM Low VOC Cleaner, P/N 19287401 (in Canada, PN 88901247), should be sprayed on the mating surface. Use care to avoid getting solvent in any area other than the mating surface to be cleaned. Allow it to soak in for several minutes to loosen the old RTV sealer/gasket material. GM strongly recommends using a plastic razor blade or non- metallic scraper to remove all loose sealer/gasket material.

Important
The appearance of the gasket surface is not critical - the feel is. There will be indentations from the gasket left in the cylinder head after all the gasket material is removed. The new gasket will fill these small indentations when it is installed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
I cannot count the time in 40years I've seen scotch brite wheels used to remove gaskets..iron head and blocks not aluminum

That's why I asked since L76 is aluminum...but my question wasn't answered what was the scotch brite for the gasket? What's the purpose if buying a new gasket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,307 Posts
gaskets are cheap. get new GM gaskets and be done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
^^ Bingo. If you're several hundred if not over a thousand into headers, stock GM gaskets are cheap insurance. I'd rather just replace them when everything is off versus taking it off a 2nd time. Sure it's not mind numbingly difficult, but my time is more valuable to me now than it was 10 years ago.


8.18 Each on RA

When I'd clean off the heads for header installs or replacing the intake manifold, I recall using a plastic ice scraper. Crude, maybe. But it'd have to be serious plastic to chew up the heads I'd think.

-J
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top